The Talbots

Big Talbot Island - Oaks Little Talbot and Big Talbot Islands are two of my favorite places for photography and for just getting away. I try to visit several times during the year. I got a late start and the overcast conditions were disappearing fast. But I've grown to accept "what is" in terms of the weather (and other things too!) so was perfectly ok if this turned into a reconnaissance trip and a chance to renew my annual Florida State Park pass. There is construction along Heckscher Drive with a new bridge over Sisters Creek. The drive is not quite as peaceful as it was when my dad used to take my brother and I out to fish at Little Talbot. I arrived at around 10 am, renewed my pass, and proceeded to the west beach. There were two cars in the parking lot. After a quick stroll along the beach I headed out to Big Talbot, crossing Simpsons Creek where it seemed like a lot of fishing was going on. I pulled off at the trailhead for Big Pine Trail which is the start of the new East Coast Greenway bike trail. The hike on Big Pine is always pleasant but the mosquitoes were still quite active. Next time I'm going to bring along my bike to experience the paved trail which is really nice. They will soon have the section completed that connects up through Amelia Island.

Big Talbot Oaks

Some of the best photography for the coastal live oaks is in the parking lot at The Bluffs. The lighting here is always sublime and there is an assortment of twisted and gnarled branches within easy access. I've photographed these trees several times already, but each time I'm here I feel as if there is something new I can capture. This area also gives you access to the beach and the driftwood along the shore (the boneyard). So what is it about these trees that holds my fascination? I am drawn to visually complex compositions. I try to make some sense out of them  by somehow understanding their inherent nature. There is a complex nature to each of us and often it is very beautiful. When we can reduce something complex into its fundamental structures, complex becomes simple and minimal, and the real beauty is revealed.

Big Talbot Oaks